Etymology
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magisterial (adj.)

1630s, "of or befitting to a master or teacher or one qualified to speak with authority," from Medieval Latin magisterialis "of or pertaining to the office of magistrate, director, or teacher," from Late Latin magisterius "having authority of a magistrate," from magister "chief, director" (see master (n.)).

By 17c. often with a suggestion of "arrogant, imperious, domineering." Meaning "holding the office of a magistrate, proper to a magistrate" is from 1650s (see magistrate). Related: Magisterially.

updated on October 30, 2018

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Definitions of magisterial from WordNet

magisterial (adj.)
of or relating to a magistrate;
official magisterial functions
magisterial (adj.)
offensively self-assured or given to exercising usually unwarranted power;
managed the employees in an aloof magisterial way
Synonyms: autocratic / bossy / dominating / high-and-mighty / peremptory
magisterial (adj.)
used of a person's appearance or behavior; befitting an eminent person;
she reigned in magisterial beauty
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.