Etymology
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luster (n.1)

"gloss, radiance, quality of shining by reflecting light," 1520s, from French lustre "gloss, radiance" (14c.), common Romanic (cognates: Spanish and Portuguese lustre, Rumanian lustru, Italian lustro "splendor, brilliancy"), a noun ultimately from Latin lustrare "spread light over, brighten, illumine," which is related to lustrum "purification" (from PIE *leuk-stro-, suffixed form of root *leuk- "light, brightness").

Especially "quality of glossiness or radiance in a textile material or fabric." Figurative meaning "radiant beauty" is from c. 1600; that of "splendor, renown" is from 1550s. Lusterware, also lustre-ware, "stoneware or crockery having surface ornamentations in metallic colors," is attested by 1820.

luster (n.2)

"one who feels intense longing desire," 1590s, agent noun from lust (v.).

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Definitions of luster

luster (n.)
a quality that outshines the usual;
luster (n.)
the visual property of something that shines with reflected light;
Synonyms: shininess / sheen / lustre
luster (n.)
a surface coating for ceramics or porcelain;
Synonyms: lustre
From wordnet.princeton.edu