Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to long

longing (n.)

"yearning, eager desire, craving," Old English langung "longing, weariness, sadness, dejection," verbal noun from long (v.).

2. Specifically, in pathol., one of the peculiar and often whimsical desires experienced by pregnant women. [Century Dictionary, 1899]
Advertisement
along (adv., prep.)
Old English andlang "entire, continuous; extended" (adj.); "alongside of" (prep.), from and- "opposite, against" (from Proto-Germanic *andi-, *anda-, from PIE *anti "against," locative singular of root *ant- "front, forehead") + lang "long" (see long (adj.)). Reinforced by Old Norse cognate endlang. Prepositional sense extended in Old English to "through the whole length of." Of position, "lengthwise," c. 1200; of movement, "onward," c. 1300. Meaning "in company, together" is from 1580s. All along "throughout" is from 1690s.
belong (v.)
mid-14c., "to go along with, properly relate to," from be- intensive prefix, + longen "to go," from Old English langian "pertain to, to go along with," which is of uncertain origin but perhaps related to the root of long (adj.). Senses of "be the property of" and "be a member of" first recorded late 14c. Cognate with Middle Dutch belanghen, Dutch belangen, German belangen. Replaced earlier Old English gelang, with completive prefix ge-.
bond (n.)

early 13c., "anything that binds, fastens, or confines," phonetic variant of band (n.1) and at first interchangeable with it. For vowel change, see long (adj.); also influenced by unrelated Old English bonda "householder," literally "dweller" (see bond (adj.)).

It preserves more distinctly than band the connection with bind and bound (adj.1) and is now the main or only form in the sense of "restraining or uniting force." From early 14c. as "an agreement or covenant;" from late 14c. as "a binding or uniting power or influence." Legalistic sense "an instrument binding one to pay a sum to another" first recorded 1590s. Meaning "a method of laying bricks in courses" is from 1670s. In chemistry, of atoms, by 1900.

daylong (adj.)

also day-long, "lasting all day," Old English dæglang; see day + long (adj.).

elongate (v.)
"to make long or longer," 1530s, from Late Latin elongatus, past participle of elongare "to prolong, protract, remove to a distance," from Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + longus "long" (see long (adj.)). Earlier in English in the same sense was elongen (mid-15c.). Related: Elongated; elongating.
elongation (n.)

c. 1400, elongacioun, in astronomy, "angular distance of a planet from the sun as it appears from the earth;" early 15c., "extension, spreading," from Medieval Latin elongationem (nominative elongatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin elongare "remove to a distance," from assimilated form of Latin ex "out" (see ex-) + longus "long" (see long (adj.)).

furlong (n.)
measure of distance of roughly 660 feet, from Old English furlang, originally the length of a furrow in a common field of 10 acres, from furh "furrow" (see furrow (n.)) + lang "long" (see long (adj.)). The "acre" of the common field being variously measured, the furlong varied but eventually was fixed by custom at 40 rods. Used from 9c. to translate Latin stadium (625 feet), one-eighth of a Roman mile, and so the English word came to be used for "one-eighth of an English mile," though this led to a different measure for the English mile than the Roman one. Furlong being so important in land deed records (where mile hardly figures) it was thought best to redefine the mile rather than the furlong, which was done under Elizabeth I.
hourlong (adj.)
also hour-long, 1803, from hour + long (adj.).
length (n.)
Old English lengðu "property of being long or extended in one direction; distance along a line," from Proto-Germanic *langitho, abstract noun from *langaz "long" (root of Old English lang; see long (adj.)) + *-itho, abstract noun suffix (see -th (2)). Cognate with Old Norse lengd, Old Frisian lengethe, Dutch lengte.

Figurative sense of "the distance one goes, extremity to which something is carried" is from 1690s. Phrase at length "to full extent" is attested from c. 1500. As "the length of a swimming pool," 1903. From the notion of "a piece or portion of the extent of anything" come the theater slang sense "a 42-line portion of an actor's part" (1736) and the sporting sense "the length of a horse, car, etc. in a race" used as a unit of measure (1650s).