Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to logical

logic (n.)

mid-14c., logike, "branch of philosophy that treats of forms of thinking; the science of distinction of true from false reasoning," from Old French logique (13c.), from Latin (ars) logica "logic," from Greek (he) logike (techne) "(the) reasoning (art)," from fem. of logikos "pertaining to speaking or reasoning" (also "of or pertaining to speech"), from logos "reason, idea, word" (see Logos). Formerly also logick. Sometimes formerly plural, as in ethics, but this is not usual. Meaning "logical argumentation" is from c. 1600. Contemptuous logic-chopper "sophist, person who uses subtle distinctions in argument" is from 1846.

Advertisement
-al (1)
suffix forming adjectives from nouns or other adjectives, "of, like, related to, pertaining to," Middle English -al, -el, from French or directly from Latin -alis (see -al (2)).
illogical (adj.)
"without sound reasoning according to rules of logic," 1580s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + logical. Related: Illogically.
metalogical (n.)

"beyond the sphere of logic, transcending logic," by 1865; see meta- in the third sense of "transcending, overarching, dealing with the most fundamental matters of" + logical. Related: Metalogic (n.), by 1842; metalogical.