Etymology
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load (n.)

c. 1200, lode, lade "that which is laid upon a person or beast, burden," a sense extension from Old English lad "a way, a course, a carrying; a street, watercourse; maintenance, support," from Proto-Germanic *laitho (source also of Old High German leita, German leite, Old Norse leið "way, road, course"), from PIE root *leit- (2) "to go forth" (see lead (v.1)).

It seems to have expanded its range of senses in early Middle English, supplanting words based on lade (v.), to which it is not etymologically connected. The older senses went with the spelling lode (q.v.). The spelling is modern. Meaning "amount customarily loaded at one time" is from c. 1300; meaning "a quantity of strong drink taken" is from 1590s. Meaning "the charge of a firearm" is from 1690s.

Meaning "a great amount or number" (often loads) is from c.1600. Figurative sense of "burden weighing on the mind, heart, or soul" is first attested 1590s. Meaning "amount (of work, etc.) to be done by one person" is attested in compounds from 1939 (first was workload). Colloquial loads "lots, heaps" is attested from c. 1600. Phrase take a load off (one's) feet "sit down, relax" is from 1914, American English. Get a load of "take a look at" is American English colloquial, attested from 1929.

load (v.)

late 15c., "to place in or on (a vehicle)," from load (n.). Sense of "add to the weight of, put a load in or on" is from c. 1500; sense of "to charge a firearm" is from 1620s. Intransitive sense "put or take on a load or charge" is from 1720; of a vehicle, "to fill with passengers," from 1832. Of computer files or programs, by 1977. Related: Loaded; loaden (the old strong past participle, persisting till 18c. in poetry but now obsolete); loading.

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Definitions of load
1
load (n.)
weight to be borne or conveyed;
Synonyms: loading / burden
load (n.)
a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time;
the system broke down under excessive loads
Synonyms: loading
load (n.)
goods carried by a large vehicle;
load (n.)
an amount of alcohol sufficient to intoxicate;
he got a load on and started a brawl
load (n.)
the power output of a generator or power plant;
load (n.)
an onerous or difficult concern;
that's a load off my mind
load (n.)
a deposit of valuable ore occurring within definite boundaries separating it from surrounding rocks;
Synonyms: lode
load (n.)
the front part of a guided missile or rocket or torpedo that carries the nuclear or explosive charge or the chemical or biological agents;
Synonyms: warhead / payload
load (n.)
electrical device to which electrical power is delivered;
2
load (v.)
fill or place a load on;
load the truck with hay
load a car
Synonyms: lade / laden / load up
load (v.)
provide (a device) with something necessary;
He loaded his gun carefully
load the camera
Synonyms: charge
load (v.)
transfer from a storage device to a computer's memory;
load (v.)
put (something) on a structure or conveyance;
load the bags onto the trucks
load (v.)
corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance; often by replacing valuable ingredients with inferior ones;
Synonyms: adulterate / stretch / dilute / debase
From wordnet.princeton.edu