Etymology
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length (n.)

Old English lengðu "property of being long or extended in one direction; distance along a line," from Proto-Germanic *langitho, abstract noun from *langaz "long" (root of Old English lang; see long (adj.)) + *-itho, abstract noun suffix (see -th (2)). Cognate with Old Norse lengd, Old Frisian lengethe, Dutch lengte.

Figurative sense of "the distance one goes, extremity to which something is carried" is from 1690s. Phrase at length "to full extent" is attested from c. 1500. As "the length of a swimming pool," 1903. From the notion of "a piece or portion of the extent of anything" come the theater slang sense "a 42-line portion of an actor's part" (1736) and the sporting sense "the length of a horse, car, etc. in a race" used as a unit of measure (1650s).

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Definitions of length

length (n.)
the linear extent in space from one end to the other; the longest dimension of something that is fixed in place;
the length of the table was 5 feet
length (n.)
continuance in time;
he complained about the length of time required
Synonyms: duration
length (n.)
the property of being the extent of something from beginning to end;
the editor limited the length of my article to 500 words
length (n.)
size of the gap between two places;
he determined the length of the shortest line segment joining the two points
Synonyms: distance
length (n.)
a section of something that is long and narrow;
a length of tubing
a length of timber
From wordnet.princeton.edu