Etymology
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leash (n.)

c. 1300, "thong for holding a dog or hound," from Old French lesse, laisse "hound's leash," ultimately from Latin laxus "loose" (see lax), perhaps via noun use of fem. form laxa. The notion seems to be of a string loosely held. Figurative sense attested from early 15c. The meaning "a set of three, three creatures of a kind" is from early 14c., originally in sporting language and especially of greyhounds, foxes, bucks, or hares.

leash (v.)

"to attach to or with a leash," 1590s, from leash (n.). Related: Leashed; leashing.

updated on June 02, 2016

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Definitions of leash from WordNet
1
leash (n.)
restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal;
Synonyms: tether / lead
leash (n.)
the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one;
Synonyms: three / " / iii / trio / threesome / tierce / troika / triad / trine / trinity / ternary / ternion / triplet / tercet / terzetto / trey / deuce-ace
leash (n.)
a figurative restraint;
he's always gotten a long leash
kept a tight leash on his emotions
Synonyms: collar
2
leash (v.)
fasten with a rope;
Synonyms: rope
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.