Etymology
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learn (v.)

Old English leornian "to get knowledge, be cultivated; study, read, think about," from Proto-Germanic *lisnojanan (cognates: Old Frisian lernia, Middle Dutch leeren, Dutch leren, Old High German lernen, German lernen "to learn," Gothic lais "I know"), with a base sense of "to follow or find the track," from PIE root *lois- "furrow, track." It is related to German Gleis "track," and to Old English læst "sole of the foot" (see last (n.1)).

From c. 1200 as "to hear of, ascertain." Transitive use (He learned me (how) to read), now considered vulgar (except in reflexive expressions, I learn English), was acceptable from c. 1200 until early 19c. It is preserved in past-participle adjective learned "having knowledge gained by study." Old English also had læran "to teach" (see lere). Related: Learning.

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Definitions of learn

learn (v.)
gain knowledge or skills;
I learned Sanskrit
She learned dancing from her sister
Synonyms: larn / acquire
learn (v.)
get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally;
I learned that she has two grown-up children
Synonyms: hear / get word / get wind / pick up / find out / get a line / discover / see
learn (v.)
commit to memory; learn by heart;
Synonyms: memorize / memorise / con
learn (v.)
be a student of a certain subject;
Synonyms: study / read / take
learn (v.)
impart skills or knowledge to;
Synonyms: teach / instruct
learn (v.)
find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort;
Synonyms: determine / check / find out / see / ascertain / watch
From wordnet.princeton.edu