Etymology
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languor (n.)

c. 1300, "disease, sickness; distress, mental suffering," from Old French langor "sickness; weakness" (12c., Modern French langueur), from Latin languorem (nominative languor) "faintness, feebleness, lassitude," from languere "be weak or faint" (see lax). Sense in English shifted to "faintness, weariness" (1650s) and "habitual want of energy" (1825).

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Definitions of languor

languor (n.)
a relaxed comfortable feeling;
Synonyms: dreaminess
languor (n.)
oppressively still air;
the afternoon was hot, quiet, and heavy with languor
Summer shows all the languor of a hot, breezeless day as the dancer lazily brushes her hand over her brow
languor (n.)
a feeling of lack of interest or energy;
Synonyms: lassitude / listlessness
languor (n.)
inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy;
Synonyms: lethargy / sluggishness / phlegm / flatness
From wordnet.princeton.edu