Etymology
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Words related to lace

lasso (n.)
"long rope with a running noose," used for catching horses and cattle, 1808, earlier laço (1768), American English, from Spanish lazo "a snare, slipknot," from Latin laqueum (nominative laqueus) "noose, snare" (see lace (n.)). As a verb from 1807. Related: Lassoed; lassoing. A lasso can serve as a lariat, but the reverse is not true.
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shoelace (n.)
also shoe-lace, 1640s, from shoe (n.) + lace (n.).
lace-up (adj.)
1831, originally of boots, from the verbal phrase, from lace (v.) + up (adv.).
lash (v.2)

"to tie or bind," as with rope or cord, 1620s, originally nautical, from French lachier, from Old French lacier "to lace on, fasten with laces; entrap, ensnare" (see lace (v.)). Related: Lashed; lashing.

strait-laced (adj.)
early 15c., of stays or bodices, "made close and tight;" see strait (adj.) + lace (v.). Figurative sense of "over-precise, prudish, strict in manners or morals" is from 1550s.
unlace (v.)
c. 1300, from un- (2) "opposite of" + lace (v.). Related: Unlaced; unlacing.
elicit (v.)

"to draw out, bring forth or to light," 1640s, from Latin elicitus, past participle of elicere "draw out, draw forth," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -licere, combining form of lacere "to entice, lure, deceive" (related to laqueus "noose, snare;" see lace (n.)). Related: Elicited; eliciting; elicits; elicitation.

enlace (v.)
late 14c., "connect, involve, entangle," from Old French enlacer "trap, ensnare, capture," from Late Latin *inlaciare, from in- (from PIE root *en "in") + *lacius, from Latin laqueus "noose" (see lace (n.)). Related: Enlaced; enlacing.
interlace (v.)
formerly also enterlace, late 14c. (trans.), "unite by crossing the laces," thus, "entangle, bind together," from Old French entrelacier (12c.), from entre- (see entre-) "between" + lacier "to tie, entangle," from laz (see lace (n.)).

Intransitive sense from 1590s. Television sense is from 1927. Related: Interlaced; interlacing; interlacement. The noun is 1904, from the verb.
laceman (n.)
dealer in laces, 1660s, from lace (n.) + man.