Etymology
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knock (v.)

Old English cnocian (West Saxon cnucian), "to pound, beat; knock (on a door)," likely of imitative origin. Figurative meaning "deprecate, put down" is from 1892. Related: Knocked; knocking. Of engines from 1869. To knock back (a drink) "swallow quickly or at a gulp" is from 1931. Many phrases are in reference to the auctioneer's hammer, for example knock down (v.) "dispose of (something) at auction" (1760).

knock (n.)

mid-14c., from knock (v.). As an engine noise, from 1899.

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Definitions of knock
1
knock (v.)
deliver a sharp blow or push;
He knocked the glass clear across the room
Synonyms: strike hard
knock (v.)
rap with the knuckles;
knock on the door
knock (v.)
knock against with force or violence;
Synonyms: bump
knock (v.)
make light, repeated taps on a surface;
Synonyms: tap / rap / pink
knock (v.)
sound like a car engine that is firing too early;
Synonyms: pink / ping
knock (v.)
find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws;
Don't knock the food--it's free
Synonyms: criticize / criticise / pick apart
2
knock (n.)
the sound of knocking (as on a door or in an engine or bearing);
the knocking grew louder
Synonyms: knocking
knock (n.)
negative criticism;
Synonyms: roast
knock (n.)
a vigorous blow;
the sudden knock floored him
Synonyms: bash / bang / smash / belt
knock (n.)
a bad experience;
the school of hard knocks
knock (n.)
the act of hitting vigorously;
Synonyms: belt / rap / whack / whang
From wordnet.princeton.edu