Etymology
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kin (n.)

c. 1200, from Old English cynn "family; race; kind, sort, rank; nature" (also "gender, sex," a sense obsolete since Middle English), from Proto-Germanic *kunja- "family" (source also of Old Frisian kenn, Old Saxon kunni "kin, kind, race, tribe," Old Norse kyn, Old High German chunni "kin, race;" Danish kjön, Swedish kön, Middle Dutch, Dutch kunne "sex, gender;" Gothic kuni "family, race," Old Norse kundr "son," German Kind "child"), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups.

In the Teutonic word, as in Latin genus and Greek [genos], three main senses appear, (1) race or stock, (2) class or kind, (3) gender or sex .... [OED]

Related to both words kind and to child. From 1590s as an adjective, from the noun and as a shortening of akin. Legal next of kin (1540s) does not include the widow, "she being specifically provided for by the law as widow" [Century Dictionary], and must be a blood relation of the deceased.

updated on July 27, 2018

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Definitions of kin from WordNet
1
kin (n.)
a person having kinship with another or others;
he's kin
Synonyms: kinsperson / family
kin (n.)
group of people related by blood or marriage;
Synonyms: kin group / kinship group / kindred / clan / tribe
2
kin (adj.)
related by blood;
Synonyms: akin / blood-related / cognate / consanguine / consanguineous / consanguineal
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.