Etymology
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Words related to jurist

abjuration (n.)
Origin and meaning of abjuration

"solemn renunciation," mid-15c., originally of heresy or idolatry, later of renunciations of oaths generally, from Latin abiurationem (nominative abiuratio) "a denying on oath," noun of action from past-participle stem of abiurare "deny on oath," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + iurare "to swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law" (see jurist). Related: Abjuratory. The oath of abjuration is "the negative part of the oath of allegiance" [Century Dictionary].

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abjure (v.)
Origin and meaning of abjure

early 15c., abjuren, "renounce on oath, repudiate, forswear," originally especially "renounce or recant (a heresy) on oath," from Old French abjurer and directly from Latin abiurare "deny on oath," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + iurare "to swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law" (see jurist). Related: Abjured; abjuring.

adjuration (n.)

late 14c., "exorcism," from Late Latin adiurationem (nominative adiuratio) "a swearing to," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin adiurare "to put (someone) to an oath," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iurare "swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law," from PIE root *yewes- "law" (see jurist). Originally a term in exorcism (with conjuration); the general sense "a solemn oath, a charging under the penalty of a curse" is from 17c.

adjure (v.)

late 14c., adjuren, "to bind by oath; to question under oath;" c. 1400 as "to charge with an oath or under penalty of a curse," from Latin adiurare "confirm by oath, add an oath, to swear to in addition; call to witness," in Late Latin "to put (someone) to an oath," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iurare "swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law" (see jurist). Related: Adjured; adjuring.

conjuration (n.)

late 14c., coniuracioun, "conspiracy, a plot, act of plotting" (senses now obsolete), also "a calling upon something supernatural, act of invoking by a sacred name, invocation of spirits, magic spell or charm," from Old French conjuracion "spell, incantation, formula used in exorcism" and directly from Latin coniurationem (nominative coniuratio) "a swearing together, conspiracy," in Medieval Latin "enchantment," noun of action from past-participle stem of coniurare "to swear together; conspire," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iurare "to swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law, an oath" (see jurist).

conjure (v.)

late 13c., "command on oath;" c. 1300, "summon by a sacred name, invoke by incantation or magic," from Old French conjurer "invoke, conjure" (12c.) and directly from Latin coniurare "to swear together; conspire," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iurare "to swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law, an oath" (see jurist).

The magical sense is from the notion of "constraining by spell" a demon to do one's bidding. Related: Conjured; conjuring. Phrase conjure up "cause to appear in the mind" (as if by magic) attested from 1580s.

injury (n.)
late 14c., "harm, damage, loss; a specific injury," from Anglo-French injurie "wrongful action" (Old French injure, 13c.), from Latin iniuria "wrong, an injustice, insult, unlawful violence, assault, damage, harm," noun use of fem. of iniurius "wrongful, unjust, unlawful," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + ius (genitive iuris) "right, law" (see jurist).
jure divino 
"by divine right," Latin phrase, from ablative of jus "law, right, justice" (see jurist) + ablative of divinus (see divine (adj.)).
juridical (adj.)
"pertaining to law," c. 1500, from Latin iuridicalis "relating to right; pertaining to justice," from iuridicus, from ius (genitive iuris) "right, law" (see jurist) + dicere "to say, speak" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). Related: Juridically.
jurisconsult (n.)
"one who gives his opinion in cases of law," c. 1600, from Latin iurisconsultus, originally two words, genitive of ius "law" (see jurist) + present participle of consultare "consult, take the advice of" (see consultation).