Etymology
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juggle (v.)

late 14c., jogelen, "entertain by clowning or doing conjuring tricks," back-formation from juggler, and in part from Old French jogler "play tricks, sing songs" (Modern French jongler), from Late Latin ioculare (source of Italian giocolare), from Latin ioculari "to jest" (see jocular).

From c. 1400 as "deceive, put (someone) under a spell." Especially of tricks of manual dexterity and legerdemain from mid-15c. Figurative use, of careers, husbands, etc., is by 1940. Related: Juggled; juggling.

updated on February 28, 2016

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Definitions of juggle from WordNet
1
juggle (v.)
influence by slyness;
Synonyms: beguile / hoodwink
juggle (v.)
manipulate by or as if by moving around components;
juggle an account so as to hide a deficit
juggle (v.)
deal with simultaneously;
She had to juggle her job and her children
juggle (v.)
throw, catch, and keep in the air several things simultaneously;
juggle (v.)
hold with difficulty and balance insecurely;
the player juggled the ball
2
juggle (n.)
the act of rearranging things to give a misleading impression;
Synonyms: juggling
juggle (n.)
throwing and catching several objects simultaneously;
Synonyms: juggling
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.