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job (n.)

"piece of work; something to be done," 1620s, from phrase jobbe of worke (1550s) "task, piece of work" (contrasted with continuous labor), a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps a variant of gobbe "mass, lump" (c. 1400; see gob) via sense of "a cart-load." Specific sense of "work done for pay" first recorded 1650s.

job. (1) A low mean lucrative busy affair. (2) Petty, piddling work; a piece of chance work. [Johnson's Dictionary]

Meaning "paid position of employment" is from 1858. Printers' slang sense "piece of work of a miscellaneous class" (posters, handbills, etc.) is from 1795, hence job-type (notably large or ornamental or of exceptional form), job-shop, etc. Job lot (1832) is from an obsolete sense of "cartload, lump," which might be a separate formation from gob.

The very broad general sense of "occurrence, business, state of things" is colloquial from c. 1700. In modern slang or colloquial use, "an example," especially a good one (of the thing indicated), 1927, "a term of wide application" [OED]. Thieves' slang sense of "theft, robbery, a planned crime" is from 1722. Slang meaning "specimen, thing, person" is from 1927. On the job "hard at work" is from 1882. Job security attested by 1932 (job insecurity by 1936); job description by 1920; job-sharing by 1972. Job-hunter is from 1928. The phrase job of work still appears as late as Trollope (1873).

Job

Biblical masc. proper name, name of an ancient patriarch whose story forms a book of the Old Testament, from Hebrew Iyyobh, which according to some scholars is literally "hated, persecuted," from ayyabh "he was hostile to," related to ebhah "enmity." Others say it means "the penitent one." Figurative of bad news, destitution, and patient endurance. Hence Job's comforter, of one who brings news of additional misfortune (1736).

job (v.)

1660s, "to buy and sell as a broker" (intransitive), from job (n.). Meaning "deal in public stocks on one's own account" is from 1721. Meaning "to cheat, betray" is from 1903; earlier "pervert public service to private advantage" (1732). Related: Jobbed; jobbing.

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Definitions of job
1
job (n.)
the principal activity in your life that you do to earn money;
Synonyms: occupation / business / line of work / line
job (n.)
a specific piece of work required to be done as a duty or for a specific fee;
estimates of the city's loss on that job ranged as high as a million dollars
the job of repairing the engine took several hours
Synonyms: task / chore
job (n.)
a workplace; as in the expression `on the job';
job (n.)
an object worked on; a result produced by working;
he held the job in his left hand and worked on it with his right
job (n.)
the responsibility to do something;
it is their job to print the truth
job (n.)
the performance of a piece of work;
he gave it up as a bad job
she did an outstanding job as Ophelia
job (n.)
a damaging piece of work;
dry rot did the job of destroying the barn
the barber did a real job on my hair
job (n.)
a state of difficulty that needs to be resolved;
it is always a job to contact him
Synonyms: problem
job (n.)
(computer science) a program application that may consist of several steps but is a single logical unit;
job (n.)
a crime (especially a robbery);
the gang pulled off a bank job in St. Louis
Synonyms: caper
2
job (v.)
profit privately from public office and official business;
job (v.)
arranged for contracted work to be done by others;
Synonyms: subcontract / farm out
job (v.)
work occasionally;
As a student I jobbed during the semester breaks
job (v.)
invest at a risk;
Synonyms: speculate
3
Job (n.)
a Jewish hero in the Old Testament who maintained his faith in God in spite of afflictions that tested him;
Job (n.)
any long-suffering person who withstands affliction without despairing;
Job (n.)
a book in the Old Testament containing Job's pleas to God about his afflictions and God's reply;
Synonyms: Book of Job
From wordnet.princeton.edu