Etymology
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irritate (v.)

1530s, "stimulate to action, rouse, incite," from Latin irritatus, past participle of irritare "excite, provoke, annoy;" according to de Vaan, probably a verb from Proto-Italic *rito- "stirred," from the same PIE root that produced English run (v.). Meaning "annoy, make impatient" in English is from 1590s. The earlier verb in English was irrite (mid-15c.), from Old French irriter. Related: Irritated; irritating.

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Definitions of irritate

irritate (v.)
cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations;
It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves
Synonyms: annoy / rag / get to / bother / get at / rile / nark / nettle / gravel / vex / chafe / devil
irritate (v.)
excite to an abnormal condition, or chafe or inflame;
Aspirin irritates my stomach
irritate (v.)
excite to some characteristic action or condition, such as motion, contraction, or nervous impulse, by the application of a stimulus;
irritate the glands of a leaf
From wordnet.princeton.edu