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invasion (n.)

mid-15c., invasioun, "an assault, attack, act of entering a country or territory as an enemy," from Old French invasion "invasion, attack, assault" (12c.), from Late Latin invasionem (nominative invasio) "an attack, invasion," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin invadere "to go, come, or get into; enter violently, penetrate into as an enemy, assail, assault, make an attack on," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + vadere "to go, to walk, go hastily," from PIE root *wadh- (2) "to go" (source also of Old English wadan "to go," Latin vadum "ford;" see wade (v.)).

In extended sense, of diseases, "a harmful incursion of any kind;" with reference to rights, etc., "infringement by intrusion, encroachment by entering into or taking away what belongs to another."

Origin and meaning of invasion

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Definitions of invasion from WordNet

invasion (n.)
the act of invading; the act of an army that invades for conquest or plunder;
invasion (n.)
any entry into an area not previously occupied;
an invasion of tourists
an invasion of locusts
Synonyms: encroachment / intrusion
invasion (n.)
(pathology) the spread of pathogenic microorganisms or malignant cells to new sites in the body;
the tumor's invasion of surrounding structures
From wordnet.princeton.edu