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interview (n.)

1510s, "face-to-face meeting, formal conference," from Middle French entrevue, verbal noun from s'entrevoir "to see each other, visit each other briefly, have a glimpse of," from entre- "between" (see inter-) + Old French voir "to see" (from Latin videre, from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Modern French interview is from English. Journalistic sense "conversation with someone to obtain statements for publication" is from 1869 in American English.

The 'interview,' as at present managed, is generally the joint product of some humbug of a hack politician and another humbug of a newspaper reporter. ["The Nation," Jan. 28, 1869]

Meaning "personal meeting to discuss hiring or employment" is by 1921; earlier it was used in military recruiting (1918).

interview (v.)

in early use also enterview, enterveu, 1540s, "to have a personal meeting," from interview (n.). Meaning "have an interview with" (usually with intent to publish what is said" is from 1869. Related: Interviewed; interviewing.

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Definitions of interview from WordNet
1
interview (v.)
conduct an interview in television, newspaper, and radio reporting;
Synonyms: question
interview (v.)
discuss formally with (somebody) for the purpose of an evaluation;
We interviewed the job candidates
interview (v.)
go for an interview in the hope of being hired;
The job candidate interviewed everywhere
2
interview (n.)
the questioning of a person (or a conversation in which information is elicited); often conducted by journalists;
my interviews with teenagers revealed a weakening of religious bonds
interview (n.)
a conference (usually with someone important);
Synonyms: consultation / audience
From wordnet.princeton.edu