Etymology
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Words related to interjection

inter- 
word-forming element used freely in English, "between, among, during," from Latin inter (prep., adv.) "among, between, betwixt, in the midst of" (also used extensively as a prefix), from PIE *enter "between, among" (source also of Sanskrit antar, Old Persian antar "among, between," Greek entera (plural) "intestines," Old Irish eter, Old Welsh ithr "among, between," Gothic undar, Old English under "under"), a comparative of root *en "in."

A living prefix in English from 15c. and used with Germanic as well as Latinate words. Spelled entre- in French; most words borrowed into English in that form were re-spelled 16c. to conform with Latin except entertain, enterprise. In Latin, spelling shifted to intel- before -l-, hence intelligence, etc.
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*ye- 

*yē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to throw, impel."

It forms all or part of: abject; abjection; adjacence; adjacent; adjective; aphetic; catheter; circumjacent; conjecture; deject; ease; ejaculate; eject; enema; gist; ictus; interjacent; inject; interject; interjection; jess; jet (v.1) "to sprout or spurt forth, shoot out;" jet (n.1) "stream of water;" jete; jetsam; jettison; jetton; jetty (n.) "pier;" joist; jut; object; objection; objective; paresis; project; projectile; reject; rejection; subjacent; subject; subjective; trajectory.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Hittite ijami "I make;" Latin iacere "to throw, cast."

interject (v.)
1570s, back-formation from interjection or else from Latin interiectus, past participle of intericere "to throw between, set between," from inter "between" (see inter-) + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Interjected; interjecting.
introjection (n.)
1856, in medicine, from intro- "on the inside, within" + stem abstracted from projection, interjection. In philosophical (1892) and psychoanalytical (1911) uses, from German introjektion; in the former sense the coinage is credited to Swiss-German philosopher Richard Avenarius (1843-1896), in the latter Sándor Ferenczi (1873-1933).