Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to intercede

intercession (n.)
early 15c., "act of interceding;" c. 1500, "intercessory prayer, a pleading on behalf of oneself or another," from Latin intercessionem (nominative intercessio) "a going between, coming between, mediation," noun of action from past participle stem of intercedere "intervene, come between, be between" (in Medieval Latin "to interpose on someone's behalf;" see intercede). The sense "pleading on behalf of another" developed in Christianity.
Advertisement
inter- 
word-forming element used freely in English, "between, among, during," from Latin inter (prep., adv.) "among, between, betwixt, in the midst of" (also used extensively as a prefix), from PIE *enter "between, among" (source also of Sanskrit antar, Old Persian antar "among, between," Greek entera (plural) "intestines," Old Irish eter, Old Welsh ithr "among, between," Gothic undar, Old English under "under"), a comparative of root *en "in."

A living prefix in English from 15c. and used with Germanic as well as Latinate words. Spelled entre- in French; most words borrowed into English in that form were re-spelled 16c. to conform with Latin except entertain, enterprise. In Latin, spelling shifted to intel- before -l-, hence intelligence, etc.
*ked- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to go, yield."

It forms all or part of: abscess; accede; access; ancestor; antecede; antecedent; cease; cede; cession; concede; decease; exceed; excess; incessant; intercede; necessary; precede; predecessor; proceed; recede; recess; recession; secede; secession; succeed; success.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sedhati "to drive, chase away;" Avestan apa-had- "turn aside, step aside;" Latin cedere "to yield, give place; to give up some right or property," originally "to go from, proceed, leave;" Old Church Slavonic chodu "a walking, going," choditi "to go."
intercessor (n.)
"one who pleads or intervenes on behalf of another," late 15c., from a specific Christian use of Latin intercessor "one who intervenes, a mediator," agent noun from intercedere (see intercede). Related: Intercessory.