Etymology
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inherit (v.)

c. 1300, "to make (someone) an heir" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French enheriter "make heir, attribute the right of inheretance to, appoint as heir," from Late Latin inhereditare "to appoint as heir," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + Latin hereditare "to inherit," from heres (genitive heredis) "heir" (see heredity).

Sense of "receive inheritance, get by succession as representative of the former possessor" is attested from mid-14c.; in Medieval Latin inhereditare also had taken on a sense "put in possession." Original sense is retained in disinherit. Related: Inherited; inheriting; inheritable.

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Definitions of inherit

inherit (v.)
obtain from someone after their death;
I inherited a castle from my French grandparents
inherit (v.)
receive from a predecessor;
The new chairman inherited many problems from the previous chair
inherit (v.)
receive by genetic transmission;
I inherited my good eyesight from my mother
From wordnet.princeton.edu