Etymology
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inform (v.)

early 14c., "to train or instruct in some specific subject," from Old French informer, enformer "instruct, teach" (13c.) and directly from Latin informare "to shape, give form to, delineate," figuratively "train, instruct, educate," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + formare "to form, shape," from forma "form" (see form (n.)). In early use also enform until c. 1600. Sense of "report facts or news, communicate information to" first recorded late 14c. Related: Informed; informing.

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Definitions of inform

inform (v.)
impart knowledge of some fact, state of affairs, or event to;
I informed him of his rights
inform (v.)
give character or essence to;
The principles that inform modern teaching
inform (v.)
act as an informer;
She had informed on her own parents for years
From wordnet.princeton.edu