Etymology
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infinite (adj.)

late 14c., "eternal, limitless," also "extremely great in number," from Old French infinit "endless, boundless" and directly from Latin infinitus "unbounded, unlimited, countless, numberless," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + finitus "defining, definite," from finis "end" (see finish (v.)). The noun meaning "that which is infinite" is from 1580s.

updated on November 19, 2015

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Definitions of infinite from WordNet
1
infinite (adj.)
having no limits or boundaries in time or space or extent or magnitude;
the infinite ingenuity of man
infinite wealth
infinite (adj.)
(of verbs) not having tense, person, or number (as a participle or gerund or infinitive);
infinite verb form
Synonyms: non-finite / nonfinite
infinite (adj.)
too numerous to be counted;
an infinite number of reasons
Synonyms: countless / innumerable / innumerous / multitudinous / myriad / numberless / uncounted / unnumberable / unnumbered / unnumerable
infinite (adj.)
total and all-embracing;
God's infinite wisdom
2
infinite (n.)
the unlimited expanse in which everything is located;
the boundless regions of the infinite
Synonyms: space
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.