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indulgence (n.)

mid-14c., in the Church sense, "a freeing from temporal punishment for sin, remission from punishment for sin that remains due after absolution," from Old French indulgence or directly from Latin indulgentia "complaisance, a yielding; fondness, tenderness, affection; remission," from indulgentem (nominative indulgens) "indulgent, kind, tender, fond," present participle of indulgere "be kind; yield, concede, be complaisant; give oneself up to, be addicted," a word of uncertain origin. It is evidently a compound, and the second element appears to be from PIE root *dlegh- "to engage oneself, be or become fixed." The first element could be in- "in" for a sense of "let someone be engaged" in something, or in- "not" for a total sense of "not be hard toward" someone.

Sense of "leniency, forbearance of restraint or control of another, gratification of desire or humor" is attested from late 14c. That of "yielding to one's inclinations" (technically self-indulgence) in English is from 1630s. In British history, Indulgence also refers to grants of certain liberties to Nonconformists under Charles II and James II, as special favors rather than legal rights. The sale of indulgences in the original Church sense was done at times merely to raise money and was widely considered corrupt; the one in 1517 helped to spark the Protestant revolt in Germany.

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Definitions of indulgence from WordNet

indulgence (n.)
an inability to resist the gratification of whims and desires;
Synonyms: self-indulgence
indulgence (n.)
a disposition to yield to the wishes of someone;
too much indulgence spoils a child
Synonyms: lenience / leniency
indulgence (n.)
the act of indulging or gratifying a desire;
Synonyms: indulging / pampering / humoring
indulgence (n.)
foolish or senseless behavior;
indulgence (n.)
the remission by the pope of the temporal punishment in purgatory that is still due for sins even after absolution;
in the Middle Ages the unrestricted sale of indulgences by pardoners became a widespread abuse
From wordnet.princeton.edu