Etymology
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induction (n.)

late 14c., "advancement toward the grace of God;" also (c. 1400) "formal installation of a clergyman," from Old French induction (14c.) or directly from Latin inductionem (nominative inductio) "a leading in, introduction, admission," noun of action from past participle stem of inducere "to lead" (see induce).

As a term in logic (early 15c.) it is from Cicero's use of inductio to translate Greek epagoge "leading to" in Aristotle. Induction starts with known instances and arrives at generalizations; deduction starts from the general principle and arrives at some individual fact. As a term in physics, in reference to electrical influence, 1801; military service sense is from 1934, American English. Related: Inductional.

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Definitions of induction

induction (n.)
a formal entry into an organization or position or office;
he was ordered to report for induction into the army
induction (n.)
an electrical phenomenon whereby an electromotive force (EMF) is generated in a closed circuit by a change in the flow of current;
Synonyms: inductance
induction (n.)
reasoning from detailed facts to general principles;
Synonyms: generalization / generalisation / inductive reasoning
induction (n.)
stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors;
Synonyms: evocation / elicitation
induction (n.)
the act of bringing about something (especially at an early time);
the induction of an anesthetic state
induction (n.)
an act that sets in motion some course of events;
Synonyms: trigger / initiation
From wordnet.princeton.edu