Etymology
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Words related to induct

induce (v.)

formerly also enduce, late 14c., "to lead by persuasions or other influences," from Latin inducere "lead into, bring in, introduce, conduct; persuade; suppose, imagine," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Meaning "to bring about" in any way (in reference to a trance, a fever, etc.) is from early 15c.; sense of "to infer by reasoning" is from 1560s. Electro-magnetic sense first recorded 1777. Related: Induced; inducing.

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andouille (n.)
type of sausage, c. 1600, from French andoille "sausage" (12c.), from Latin inductilia, neuter plural of inductilis, from inducere "to load or put in" (see induct). The original notion was perhaps of the filling "introduced" into the sausage.
inductance (n.)
1879, in electricity, from induct + -ance.
inductee (n.)
1941, American English, from induct + -ee.