Etymology
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incorruptible (adj.)

mid-14c.,  of matter, "imperishable;" of the soul, etc., "immortal, everlasting," from Old French incorruptible (14c.), or directly from Late Latin incorruptibilis "incorruptible," from Latin incorruptus "unspoiled, unseduced," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + corruptus, past participle of corrumpere "to destroy; spoil," figuratively "corrupt, seduce, bribe" (see corrupt (adj.)). From 1660s in English as "not corruptible morally," especially with reference to taking bribes, etc. Related: Incorruptibly.

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Definitions of incorruptible

incorruptible (adj.)
incapable of being morally corrupted;
incorruptible judges are the backbone of the society
From wordnet.princeton.edu