Etymology
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inanimate (adj.)

early 15c., "without vital force, having lost life," from Late Latin inanimatus "lifeless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + animatus (see animation). The Latin word closest corresponding in form and sense is inanimalis. Meaning "lacking vivacity, without spirit, dull" is from 1734. Inanimate as a verb meant "infuse with life or vigor" (17c.), from the other in- (see in- (2)).

updated on December 22, 2021

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Definitions of inanimate from WordNet

inanimate (adj.)
belonging to the class of nouns denoting nonliving things;
the word `car' is inanimate
inanimate (adj.)
not endowed with life;
the inorganic world is inanimate
inanimate objects
Synonyms: nonliving / non-living
inanimate (adj.)
appearing dead; not breathing or having no perceptible pulse;
an inanimate body
Synonyms: breathless / pulseless
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.