Etymology
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imprint (v.)

formerly also emprint, late 14c., imprenten, emprenten, "to mark by pressure, stamp; to impress on the mind or memory," from Old French empreinter "to stamp, engrave, imprint," from empreinte "mark, impression, imprint" (13c.), noun use of fem. past participle of eimpreindre "to impress, imprint," from Vulgar Latin *impremere, from Latin imprimere "to impress, imprint," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + premere "to press, hold fast, cover, crowd, compress" (from PIE root *per- (4) "to strike").

imprint (n.)

mid-15c., emprente "an imprint or mark, impression made by printing or stamping," from Old French empreinte "mark, impression, imprint" (see imprint (v.)). Meaning "publication information of a book" (1790) is directly from the verb.

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Definitions of imprint
1
imprint (n.)
a distinctive influence;
English stills bears the imprint of the Norman invasion
imprint (n.)
a concavity in a surface produced by pressing;
Synonyms: depression / impression
imprint (n.)
an identification of a publisher; a publisher's name along with the date and address and edition that is printed at the bottom of the title page;
the book was published under a distinguished imprint
imprint (n.)
an impression produced by pressure or printing;
Synonyms: embossment
imprint (n.)
a device produced by pressure on a surface;
2
imprint (v.)
establish or impress firmly in the mind;
We imprint our ideas onto our children
Synonyms: form
imprint (v.)
mark or stamp with or as if with pressure;
Synonyms: impress
From wordnet.princeton.edu