Etymology
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imperial (adj.)

late 14c., "having a commanding quality," from Old French imperial, emperial "imperial; princely, splendid; strong, powerful" (12c.), from Latin imperialis "of the empire or emperor," from imperium "empire" (see empire).

Meaning "pertaining to an empire" (especially Rome's) is from late 14c.; by 1774 of Britain's. Meaning "of imposing size or excellence" is from 1731. Imperial presidency in a U.S. context traces to Arthur Schlesinger Jr.'s book on the Nixon administration (1974). Related: Imperially. The noun is from 1520s as "member of the emperor's party;" 1670s as the name of gold coins issued by various imperial authorities.

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Definitions of imperial
1
imperial (adj.)
relating to or associated with an empire;
imperial colony
the imperial gallon was standardized legally throughout the British Empire
imperial (adj.)
of or belonging to the British Imperial System of weights and measures;
imperial (adj.)
befitting or belonging to an emperor or empress;
imperial palace
imperial (adj.)
belonging to or befitting a supreme ruler;
golden age of imperial splendor
Synonyms: majestic / purple / regal / royal
2
imperial (n.)
a small tufted beard worn by Emperor Napoleon III;
Synonyms: imperial beard
imperial (n.)
a piece of luggage carried on top of a coach;
From wordnet.princeton.edu