Etymology
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immaculate (adj.)

mid-15c., "free from mental or moral pollution, pure," from a figurative use of Latin immaculatus "unstained," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + maculatus "spotted, defiled," past participle of maculare "to spot," from macula "spot, blemish," a word of uncertain origin. The literal sense of "spotlessly clean or neat" in English is first attested 1735. Related: Immaculately.

The phrase Immaculate Conception "freedom from original sin possessed by the Virgin Mary from her conception in her mother's womb" is from late 15c. in English (from French conception immaculée); the idea itself had been debated in the Church since 12c., declared to be an article of faith in 1854.

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Definitions of immaculate

immaculate (adj.)
completely neat and clean;
in her immaculate white uniform
the apartment was immaculate
Synonyms: speckless / spick-and-span / spic-and-span / spic / spick / spotless
immaculate (adj.)
free from stain or blemish;
Synonyms: undefiled
immaculate (adj.)
without fault or error;
an immaculate record
timing and technique were immaculate
Synonyms: faultless / impeccable / incorrupted
From wordnet.princeton.edu