Etymology
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husky (adj.)

"hoarse," c. 1722 in reference to a cattle disease (of persons, 1740), from husk (n.) + -y (2) on the notion of "dry as a husk." Earlier (1550s) "having husks, full of husks." Sense of "tough and strong" (like corn husks) is first found 1869, American English. Related: Huskily; huskiness.

husky (n.)

"Eskimo dog," 1852, Canadian English, earlier (1830) hoskey "an Eskimo," probably shortened variant of Ehuskemay (1743), itself a variant of Eskimo.

The moment any vessel is noticed steering for these islands [Whalefish Islands], the Esquimaux, or "Huskies,"* as the Danes customarily term them, come off in sufficient numbers to satisfy you that you are near the haunts of uncivilized men, and will afford sufficient information to guide any stranger to his anchorage. *"Husky" is their own term. I recollect the chorus to a song at Kamtchatka was "Husky, Husky." ["Last of the Arctic Voyages," London, 1855]

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Definitions of husky
1
husky (adj.)
muscular and heavily built;
clothing sizes for husky boys
Synonyms: beefy / burly / strapping / buirdly
husky (adj.)
deep and harsh sounding as if from shouting or illness or emotion; "makes all the instruments sound powerful but husky"- Virgil Thomson;
Synonyms: gruff / hoarse
2
husky (n.)
breed of heavy-coated Arctic sled dog;
Synonyms: Eskimo dog
From wordnet.princeton.edu