Etymology
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humble (adj.)

late 13c., of persons, "submissive, respectful, lowly in manner, modest, not self-asserting, obedient," from Old French humble, umble, earlier umele, from Latin humilis "lowly, humble," literally "on the ground," from humus "earth" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth"). From late 14c., of things, "lowly in kind, state, condition, or amount," also, of persons, "of low birth or rank." Related: Humbly.

Don't be so humble; you're not that great. [Golda Meir]

humble (v.)

late 14c., "render oneself humble" (intrans.), also "to bend, kneel or bow;" late 15c. "lower (someone) in dignity" (trans.); see humble (adj.). Related: Humbled; humbling.

updated on September 07, 2022

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Definitions of humble from WordNet
1
humble (adj.)
marked by meekness or modesty; not arrogant or prideful; "essentially humble...and self-effacing, he achieved the highest formal honors and distinctions"- B.K.Malinowski;
a humble apology
humble (adj.)
low or inferior in station or quality;
a humble cottage
Synonyms: low / lowly / modest / small
humble (adj.)
used of unskilled work (especially domestic work);
Synonyms: menial / lowly
humble (adj.)
of low birth or station (`base' is archaic in this sense);
of humble (or lowly) birth
Synonyms: base / baseborn / lowly
2
humble (v.)
cause to be unpretentious;
This experience will humble him
humble (v.)
cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of;
Synonyms: humiliate / mortify / chagrin / abase
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.