Etymology
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hostile (adj.)

late 15c., from French hostile "of or belonging to an enemy" (15c.) or directly from Latin hostilis "of an enemy, belonging to or characteristic of the enemy; inimical," from hostis, in earlier use "a stranger, foreigner," in classical use "an enemy," from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host." The noun meaning "hostile person" is recorded from 1838, American English, a word from the Indian wars. Related: Hostilely.

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Definitions of hostile
1
hostile (adj.)
characterized by enmity or ill will;
a hostile nation
a hostile remark
hostile actions
hostile (adj.)
not belonging to your own country's forces or those of an ally;
hostile naval and air forces
hostile (adj.)
impossible to bring into friendly accord;
hostile factions
hostile (adj.)
very unfavorable to life or growth;
a hostile climate
Synonyms: uncongenial / unfriendly
hostile (adj.)
unsolicited and resisted by the management of the target company (used of attempts to buy or take control of a business);
hostile bid
hostile tender offer
hostile takeover
2
hostile (n.)
troops belonging to the enemy's military forces;
the platoon ran into a pack of hostiles
From wordnet.princeton.edu