Etymology
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hitch (v.)

mid-15c., probably from Middle English icchen "to move as with jerks or pauses; to stir" (c. 1200), a word of unknown origin. The connection with icchen might be in notion of "hitching up" pants or boots with a jerking motion. Sense of "become fastened," especially by a hook, first recorded 1570s, originally nautical. Meaning "to marry" is from 1844 (to hitch horses together "get along well," especially of married couples, is from 1837, American English). Short for hitchhike (v.) by 1931. Related: Hitched; hitching. To (figuratively) hitch (one's) wagon to a star is by 1862.

hitch (n.)

1660s, "a limp or hobble;" 1670s, "an abrupt movement," from hitch (v.). Meaning "a means by which a rope is made fast" is from 1769, nautical. The sense of "obstruction" (usually unforeseen and temporary) is first recorded 1748; military sense of "enlistment" is from 1835.

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Definitions of hitch
1
hitch (n.)
a period of time spent in military service;
Synonyms: enlistment / term of enlistment / tour of duty / duty tour / tour
hitch (n.)
the state of inactivity following an interruption;
Synonyms: arrest / check / halt / stay / stop / stoppage
hitch (n.)
an unforeseen obstacle;
Synonyms: hang-up / rub / snag
hitch (n.)
a connection between a vehicle and the load that it pulls;
hitch (n.)
a knot that can be undone by pulling against the strain that holds it; a temporary knot;
hitch (n.)
any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome;
hitch (n.)
the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg;
Synonyms: hobble / limp
2
hitch (v.)
to hook or entangle;
Synonyms: catch
hitch (v.)
walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury;
Synonyms: limp / gimp / hobble
hitch (v.)
jump vertically, with legs stiff and back arched;
Synonyms: buck / jerk
hitch (v.)
travel by getting free rides from motorists;
Synonyms: hitchhike / thumb
hitch (v.)
connect to a vehicle: "hitch the trailer to the car";
From wordnet.princeton.edu