Etymology
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hence (adv.)

"(away) from here," late 13c., hennes, with adverbial genitive -s + Old English heonan "away, hence," from West Germanic *hin- (source also of Old Saxon hinan, Old High German hinnan, German hinnen), from PIE *ki-, variant of root *ko- "this," the stem of the demonstrative pronoun (see here).

The modern spelling (mid-15c.) is phonetic, to retain the breathy -s- (compare twice, once, since). Original "away from this place;" of time, "from this moment onward," late 14c.; meaning "from this (fact or circumstance)" first recorded 1580s. Wyclif (1382) uses hennys & þennys for "from here and there, on both sides."

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Definitions of hence

hence (adv.)
(used to introduce a logical conclusion) from that fact or reason or as a result;
the eggs were fresh and hence satisfactory
Synonyms: therefore / thence / thus / so
hence (adv.)
from this place;
get thee hence!
hence (adv.)
from this time;
a year hence it will be forgotten
From wordnet.princeton.edu