Etymology
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hear (v.)

Old English heran (Anglian), (ge)hieran, hyran (West Saxon) "to hear, perceive by the ear, listen (to), obey, follow; accede to, grant; judge," from Proto-Germanic *hausejanan (source also of Old Norse heyra, Old Frisian hera, hora, Dutch horen, German hören, Gothic hausjan "to hear"), from PIE root *kous- "to hear" (source also of Greek koein "to mark, perceive, hear;" see acoustic). The shift from *-s- to -r- is a regular feature in some Germanic languages. For the vowels, see head (n.).

Spelling distinction between hear and here developed 1200-1550. Meaning "be told, learn by report" is from early 14c. Old English also had the excellent adjective hiersum "ready to hear, obedient," literally "hear-some" with suffix from handsome, etc. Hear, hear! (1680s) originally was imperative, an exclamation to call attention to a speaker's words ("hear him!"); now a general cheer of approval. To not hear of "have nothing to do with" is from 1754.

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Definitions of hear

hear (v.)
perceive (sound) via the auditory sense;
hear (v.)
get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally;
Synonyms: learn / get word / get wind / pick up / find out / get a line / discover / see
hear (v.)
examine or hear (evidence or a case) by judicial process;
The jury had heard all the evidence
Synonyms: try
hear (v.)
receive a communication from someone;
We heard nothing from our son for five years
hear (v.)
listen and pay attention;
We must hear the expert before we make a decision
Synonyms: listen / take heed
From wordnet.princeton.edu