Etymology
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harp (n.)

Old English hearpe "harp, stringed musical instrument played with the fingers," from Proto-Germanic *harpon- (source also of Old Saxon harpa "instrument of torture;" Old Norse harpa, Dutch harp, Old High German harpfa, German Harfe "harp") of uncertain origin. Late Latin harpa, source of words in some Romanic languages (Italian arpa, Spanish arpa, French harpe), is a borrowing from Germanic. Meaning "harmonica" is from 1887, short for mouth-harp. The harp seal (1784) is so called for the harp-shaped markings on its back.

harp (v.)

Old English hearpian "to play on a harp;" see harp (n.). Cognate with Middle Dutch, Dutch harpen, Middle High German harpfen, German harfen. Figurative sense of "talk overmuch" (about something), "dwell exclusively on one subject" first recorded mid-15c. Related: Harped; harping.

updated on May 26, 2015

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Definitions of harp from WordNet
1
harp (n.)
a chordophone that has a triangular frame consisting of a sounding board and a pillar and a curved neck; the strings stretched between the neck and the soundbox are plucked with the fingers;
harp (n.)
a pair of curved vertical supports for a lampshade;
harp (n.)
a small rectangular free-reed instrument having a row of free reeds set back in air holes and played by blowing into the desired hole;
Synonyms: harmonica / mouth organ / mouth harp
2
harp (v.)
come back to;
She is always harping on the same old things
Synonyms: dwell
harp (v.)
play the harp;
She harped the Saint-Saens beautifully
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.