Etymology
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hang (v.)

a fusion of Old English hon "suspend" (transitive, class VII strong verb; past tense heng, past participle hangen), and Old English hangian "be suspended" (intransitive, weak, past tense hangode); also probably influenced by Old Norse hengja "suspend," and hanga "be suspended." All from Proto-Germanic *hanhan (transitive), *hanganan (intransitive) "to hang" (source also of Old Frisian hangia, Dutch hangen, German hängen), from PIE *konk- "to hang" (source also of Gothic hahan, Hittite gang- "to hang," Sanskrit sankate "wavers," Latin cunctari "to delay;" see also second element in Stonehenge).

As a method of execution, in late Old English (but originally specifically of crucifixion). Meaning "to come to a standstill" (especially in hung jury) is from 1848, American English. Hung emerged as past participle 16c. in northern England dialect, and hanged endured only in legal language (which tends to be conservative) in reference to capital punishment and in metaphors extended from it (I'll be hanged).

Teen slang sense of "spend time" first recorded 1951; hang around "idle, loiter" is from 1828, American English; also compare hang out. To hang back "be reluctant to proceed" is from 1580s; phrase hang an arse "hesitate, hold back" is from 1590s. Verbal phrase hang fire (1781) originally was used of guns that were slow in communicating the fire through the vent to the charge. To let it all hang out "be relaxed and uninhibited" is from 1967.

hang (n.)

late 15c., "a sling," from hang (v.). Meaning "a curtain" is from c. 1500; that of "the way in which a thing (especially cloth) hangs" is from 1797. To get the hang of (something) "become capable" is from 1834, American English, perhaps originally in reference to a certain tool or feat, but, if so, its origin has been forgotten. It doesn't seem to have been originally associated with drapery or any other special use of hang; the connecting notion might be "general bent or tendency."

'To get the hang of a thing,' is to get the knack, or habitual facility of doing it well. A low expression frequently heard among us. In the Craven Dialect of England is the word hank, a habit; from which this word hang may perhaps be derived. [John Russell Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," New York, 1848]

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Definitions of hang
1
hang (v.)
be suspended or hanging;
The flag hung on the wall
hang (v.)
cause to be hanging or suspended;
Synonyms: hang up
hang (v.)
kill by hanging;
The murderer was hanged on Friday
Synonyms: string up
hang (v.)
let drop or droop;
hang (v.)
fall or flow in a certain way;
This dress hangs well
Synonyms: fall / flow
hang (v.)
be menacing, burdensome, or oppressive;
This worry hangs on my mind
The cloud of suspicion hangs over her
hang (v.)
give heed (to);
She hung on his every word
Synonyms: attend / advert / pay heed / give ear
hang (v.)
be suspended or poised;
Heavy fog hung over the valley
hang (v.)
hold on tightly or tenaciously;
hang on to your father's hands
Synonyms: cling
hang (v.)
be exhibited;
Picasso hangs in this new wing of the museum
hang (v.)
prevent from reaching a verdict, of a jury;
hang (v.)
decorate or furnish with something suspended;
hang (v.)
be placed in position as by a hinge;
This cabinet door doesn't hang right!
hang (v.)
place in position as by a hinge so as to allow free movement in one direction;
hang a door
hang (v.)
suspend (meat) in order to get a gamey taste;
hang the venison for a few days
2
hang (n.)
a special way of doing something;
he couldn't get the hang of it
Synonyms: bent / knack
hang (n.)
the way a garment hangs;
he adjusted the hang of his coat
hang (n.)
a gymnastic exercise performed on the rings or horizontal bar or parallel bars when the gymnast's weight is supported by the arms;
From wordnet.princeton.edu