Etymology
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green (adj.)

Old English grene, Northumbrian groene "green, of the color of living plants," in reference to plants, "growing, living, vigorous," also figurative, of a plant, "freshly cut," of wood, "unseasoned" earlier groeni, from Proto-Germanic *grōni- (source also of Old Saxon grani, Old Frisian grene, Old Norse grænn, Danish grøn, Dutch groen, Old High German gruoni, German grün), from PIE root *ghre- "grow" (see grass), through sense of "color of growing plants."

From c. 1200 as "covered with grass or foliage." From early 14c. of fruit or vegetables, "unripe, immature;" and of persons, "of tender age, youthful, immature, inexperienced;" hence "gullible, immature with regard to judgment" (c. 1600). From mid-13c. in reference to the skin or complexion of one sick.

Green cheese originally was that which is new or fresh (late 14c.), later with reference to coloring; for the story told to children that the moon is made of it, see cheese (n.1). Green light in figurative sense of "permission" is from 1937 (green and red as signals on railways first attested 1883, as nighttime substitutes for semaphore flags). Green thumb for "natural for gardening" is by 1938. Green beret originally "British commando" is from 1949. Greenroom (also green room) "room for actors when not on stage" is from 1701; presumably a once-well-known one was painted green. The color of environmentalism since 1971.

green (v.)

Old English grenian "to become green, flourish" (see green (adj.)). Compare Dutch groenen, German grünen, Old Norse grona. Meaning "to make green" is 1560s. Related: Greened; greening.

green (n.)

late Old English, "green color or pigment, spectral color between blue and yellow;" also "a field, grassy place; green garments; green foliage," from green (adj.). Specific sense "piece of grassland in a village belonging to the community" is by late 15c. In golf, "the putting portion of the links" by 1849. Symbolic of inconstancy since late 14c., perhaps because in nature it changes or fades. Also symbolic of envy and jealousy since Middle English. Shakespeare's green-eyed monster of "Othello" sees all through eyes tinged with jealousy. "Greensleeves," ballad of an inconstant lady-love, is from 1570s. The color of the cloth in royal counting houses from late 14c., later the color of the cloth on gambling tables.

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Definitions of green
1
green (n.)
green color or pigment; resembling the color of growing grass;
Synonyms: greenness / viridity
green (n.)
a piece of open land for recreational use in an urban area;
Synonyms: park / commons / common
green (n.)
an area of closely cropped grass surrounding the hole on a golf course;
the ball rolled across the green and into the bunker
Synonyms: putting green / putting surface
green (n.)
any of various leafy plants or their leaves and stems eaten as vegetables;
Synonyms: greens / leafy vegetable
green (n.)
street names for ketamine;
Synonyms: k / jet / super acid / special K / honey oil / cat valium / super C
2
green (adj.)
of the color between blue and yellow in the color spectrum; similar to the color of fresh grass;
a green tree
green paint
green fields
Synonyms: greenish / light-green / dark-green
green (adj.)
concerned with or supporting or in conformity with the political principles of the Green Party;
green (adj.)
not fully developed or mature; not ripe;
fried green tomatoes
green wood
Synonyms: unripe / unripened / immature
green (adj.)
looking pale and unhealthy;
green around the gills
you're looking green
green (adj.)
naive and easily deceived or tricked;
Synonyms: fleeceable / gullible
3
green (v.)
turn or become green;
The trees are greening
4
Green (n.)
United States labor leader who was president of the American Federation of Labor from 1924 to 1952 and who led the struggle with the Congress of Industrial Organizations (1873-1952);
Synonyms: William Green
Green (n.)
an environmentalist who belongs to the Green Party;
Green (n.)
a river that rises in western Wyoming and flows southward through Utah to become a tributary of the Colorado River;
Synonyms: Green River
From wordnet.princeton.edu