Etymology
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glide (v.)

Old English glidan "move along smoothly and easily; glide away, vanish; slip, slide" (class I strong verb, past tense glad, past participle gliden), from Proto-Germanic *glidan "to glide" (source also of Old Saxon glidan, Old Frisian glida, Old High German glitan, German gleiten), probably part of the large group of Germanic words in gl- involving notions of "smooth; shining; joyful," from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine." Related: Glided; gliding. Strong past tense form glid persisted into 20c.

glide (n.)

1580s, from glide (v.). From 1835 as a term in music; from 1889 as a step in dancing or a type of dance.

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Definitions of glide
1
glide (v.)
move smoothly and effortlessly;
glide (v.)
fly in or as if in a glider plane;
glide (v.)
cause to move or pass silently, smoothly, or imperceptibly;
2
glide (n.)
a vowellike sound that serves as a consonant;
Synonyms: semivowel
glide (n.)
the act of moving smoothly along a surface while remaining in contact with it;
Synonyms: slide / coast
glide (n.)
the activity of flying a glider;
Synonyms: gliding / sailplaning / soaring / sailing
From wordnet.princeton.edu