Etymology
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Words related to glebe

agglomerate (v.)
1680s, "collect or gather in a mass" (trans.), from Latin agglomeratus, past participle of agglomerare "to wind or add onto a ball," from ad "to" (see ad-) + glomerare "wind up in a ball," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "ball of yarn," which is of uncertain origin (see glebe). Intransitive sense "grow into a mass" is from 1730. Related: Agglomerated; agglomerating.
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agglomeration (n.)

1774, "action of collecting in a mass," from Latin agglomerationem (nominative agglomeratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of agglomerare "to wind or add onto a ball," from ad "to" (see ad-) + glomerare "wind up in a ball," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "ball, ball of yarn, ball-shaped mass," which is of uncertain origin (see glebe). In reference to a mass so formed, it is recorded from 1833.

clam (n.)

bivalve mollusk, c. 1500 (in clam-shell), originally Scottish, apparently a particular use of Middle English clam "pincers, vice, clamp" (late 14c.), from Old English clamm "bond, fetter, grip, grasp," from Proto-Germanic *klam- "to press or squeeze together" (source also of Old High German klamma "cramp, fetter, constriction," German Klamm "a constriction"), possibly from a PIE *glem- or *glom- "contain, embrace" (see glebe).

If this is right then the original reference is to the shell. Clam-chowder attested from 1822. To be happy as a clam is from 1833, but the earliest uses do not elaborate on the notion behind it, unless it be self-containment.

clamp (n.)

device for fastening or holding, c. 1300, probably from Middle Dutch clampe (Dutch klamp), from Proto-Germanic *klam-b- "clamp, cleat;" cognate with Middle Low German klampe "clasp, hook," Old High German klampfer "clip, clamp;" also probably related to Middle Dutch klamme "a clamp, hook, grapple," Danish klamme "a clamp, cramp," Old English clamm "a tie, fetter," perhaps from the same root as Latin glomus "ball-shaped mass" (see glebe).

It took the place of earlier clam "clamp, brace," from Old English clamm "bond, fetter, grip, grasp" (see clam (n.)).

conglomerate (adj.)

"gathered into a ball or rounded mass," 1570s, from Latin conglomeratus, past participle of conglomerare "to roll together, concentrate, heap up," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + glomerare "to gather into a ball, collect," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "a ball, ball-shaped mass," possibly from PIE *glem- (see glebe).

conglomerate (v.)

1590s, transitive, "to form into a ball, to gather into a ball or round body," from Latin conglomeratus, past participle of conglomerare "to roll together, concentrate, heap up," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + glomerare "to gather into a ball, collect," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "a ball, ball-shaped mass," possibly from PIE *glem- (see glebe). Intransitive sense of "to come together in a rounded mass" is from 1640s. Related: Conglomerated; conglomerating.

conglomeration (n.)

1620s, "act of gathering into a ball or mass," from Late Latin conglomerationem (nominative conglomeratio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin conglomerare "to roll together, concentrate, heap up," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + glomerare "to gather into a ball, collect," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "a ball, ball-shaped mass," possibly from PIE *glem- (see glebe). Meaning "that which is conglomerated" is from 1650s.

globe (n.)

late 14c., "a large mass;" mid-15c., "spherical solid body, a sphere," from Old French globe (14c.) and directly from Latin globus "round mass, sphere, ball" (also, of men, "a throng, crowd, body, mass"), which is related to gleba "clod, lump of soil" (see glebe) and perhaps also to glomus "a ball, ball of yarn."

Sense of "the planet earth," also "map of the earth or sky drawn on the surface of an artificial sphere" are attested from 1550s. Meaning "globe-shaped glass vessel" is from 1660s. "A globe is often solid, a sphere often hollow. The secondary senses of globe are physical; those of sphere are moral." [Century Dictionary].

glomeration (n.)

"accumulation; ball," 1620s, from Latin glomerationem (nominative glomeratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of glomerare "to wind or form into a ball, roll together, collect," from glomus "ball of yarn, ball-shaped mass," from Proto-Italic *glemos-, from PIE *glem- or *glom-, perhaps originally "ball," but the reconstruction is uncertain (see glebe).