Etymology
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gladiolus (n.)

"wild iris," c. 1000, from Latin gladiolus "wild iris, sword-lily," literally "small sword," diminutive of gladius "sword" (see gladiator); the plant so called by Pliny in reference to its sword-shaped leaves. The Old English form of the word was gladdon. Form gladiol is attested from mid-15c.; the modern use perhaps represents a 1560s reborrowing from Latin.

updated on March 09, 2015

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Definitions of gladiolus from WordNet

gladiolus (n.)
the large central part of the breastbone;
Synonyms: corpus sternum
gladiolus (n.)
any of numerous plants of the genus Gladiolus native chiefly to tropical and South Africa having sword-shaped leaves and one-sided spikes of brightly colored funnel-shaped flowers; widely cultivated;
Synonyms: gladiola / glad / sword lily
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.