Etymology
Advertisement

gee (interj.)

exclamation of surprise, 1895, probably euphemistic for Jesus. Form gee whiz is attested from 1871; gee whillikens (1851) seems to be the oldest form. As a command to a horse to go, 1620s, Scottish. It had a particular sense as a teamster's command: "go to the right (or off) side of the driver." Extended form gee-up is from 1733, the second element said by OED to be hup.

updated on February 24, 2015

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of gee from WordNet
1
gee (v.)
turn to the right side;
the horse geed
gee (v.)
give a command to a horse to turn to the right side;
2
gee (n.)
a unit of force equal to the force exerted by gravity; used to indicate the force to which a body is subjected when it is accelerated;
Synonyms: g / g-force
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.