Etymology
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gauntlet (n.1)

"glove," early 15c., gantelet, from Old French gantelet (13c.) "gauntlet worn by a knight in armor," also a token of one's personality or person, and in medieval custom symbolizing a challenge, as in tendre son gantelet "throw down the gauntlet" (a sense found in English by 1540s). The Old French word is a semi-diminutive or double-diminutive of gant "glove" (12c.), earlier wantos (7c.), from Frankish *wanth-, from Proto-Germanic *wantuz "glove" (source also of Middle Dutch want "mitten," East Frisian want, wante, Old Norse vöttr "glove," Danish vante "mitten"), which apparently is related to Old High German wintan, Old English windan "turn around, wind" (see wind (v.1)).

The name must orig. have applied to a strip of cloth wrapped about the hand to protect it from sword-blows, a frequent practice in the Icelandic sagas. [Buck]

Italian guanto, Spanish guante likewise are ultimately from Germanic. The spelling with -u- was established from 1500s.

gauntlet (n.2)

military punishment in which offender runs between rows of men who beat him in passing; see gantlet.

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Definitions of gauntlet

gauntlet (n.)
to offer or accept a challenge;
took up the gauntlet
threw down the gauntlet
Synonyms: gantlet
gauntlet (n.)
a glove of armored leather; protects the hand;
Synonyms: gantlet / metal glove
gauntlet (n.)
a glove with long sleeve;
Synonyms: gantlet
gauntlet (n.)
a form of punishment in which a person is forced to run between two lines of men facing each other and armed with clubs or whips to beat the victim;
Synonyms: gantlet
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near gauntlet

gaudy

gauge

Gaul

Gaulish

gaunt

gauntlet

gauss

Gautama

gauze

gauzy

gavage