Etymology
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gate (n.)

"opening, entrance," Old English geat (plural geatu) "gate, door, opening, passage, hinged framework barrier," from Proto-Germanic *gatan (source also of Old Norse gat "opening, passage," Old Saxon gat "eye of a needle, hole," Old Frisian gat "hole, opening," Dutch gat "gap, hole, breach," German Gasse "street, lane, alley"), of unknown origin. Meaning "money collected from selling tickets" dates from 1896 (short for gate money, 1820). Gate-crasher is from 1926 as "uninvited party guest;" 1925 in reference to motorists who run railway gates. Finnish katu, Lettish gatua "street" are Germanic loan-words.

gate (v.)

"provide with a gate," 1906, from gate (n.). Originally of moulds. Related: Gated (1620s). Gated community recorded by 1989 (earliest reference to Emerald Bay, Laguna Beach, Calif.).

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Definitions of gate
1
gate (n.)
a movable barrier in a fence or wall;
gate (n.)
a computer circuit with several inputs but only one output that can be activated by particular combinations of inputs;
Synonyms: logic gate
gate (n.)
total admission receipts at a sports event;
gate (n.)
passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark;
2
gate (v.)
supply with a gate;
The house was gated
gate (v.)
control with a valve or other device that functions like a gate;
gate (v.)
restrict (school boys') movement to the dormitory or campus as a means of punishment;
From wordnet.princeton.edu