Etymology
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G

seventh letter of the alphabet, invented by the Romans; a modified gamma introduced c. 250 B.C.E. to restore a dedicated symbol for the "g" sound. For fuller history, see C

Before the vowels -e-, -i-, and -y-, Old English initial g- changed its sound and is represented in Modern English by consonantal y- (year, yard, yellow, young, yes, etc.). In get and give, however, the initial g- seems to have been preserved by Scandinavian influence. As a movie rating in the U.S., 1966, standing for general (adj.). Standing for gravity in physics since 1785.

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Definitions of G

g (n.)
a metric unit of weight equal to one thousandth of a kilogram;
Synonyms: gram / gramme / gm
g (n.)
a purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with cytosine;
Synonyms: guanine
g (n.)
the cardinal number that is the product of 10 and 100;
Synonyms: thousand / one thousand / " / m / k / chiliad / grand / thou / yard
g (n.)
a unit of force equal to the force exerted by gravity; used to indicate the force to which a body is subjected when it is accelerated;
Synonyms: gee / g-force
g (n.)
a unit of information equal to 1000 megabytes or 10^9 (1,000,000,000) bytes;
Synonyms: gigabyte / gb
g (n.)
a unit of information equal to 1024 mebibytes or 2^30 (1,073,741,824) bytes;
Synonyms: gigabyte / gibibyte / gb / GiB
g (n.)
(physics) the universal constant relating force to mass and distance in Newton's law of gravitation;
Synonyms: gravitational constant / universal gravitational constant / constant of gravitation
g (n.)
one of the four nucleotides used in building DNA; all four nucleotides have a common phosphate group and a sugar (ribose);
Synonyms: deoxyguanosine monophosphate
From wordnet.princeton.edu