Etymology
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fugue (n.)

type of musical composition, 1590s, fuge, from Italian fuga, literally "flight," also "ardor," from Latin fuga "a running away, act of fleeing," from fugere "to flee" (see fugitive (adj.)). Current English spelling (1660s) is from the French version of the Italian word.

A Fugue is a composition founded upon one subject, announced at first in one part alone, and subsequently imitated by all the other parts in turn, according to certain general principles to be hereafter explained. The name is derived from the Latin word fuga, a flight, from the idea that one part starts on its course alone, and that those which enter later are pursuing it. ["Fugue," Ebenezer Prout, 1891]

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Definitions of fugue

fugue (n.)
dissociative disorder in which a person forgets who they are and leaves home to create a new life; during the fugue there is no memory of the former life; after recovering there is no memory for events during the dissociative state;
Synonyms: psychogenic fugue
fugue (n.)
a dreamlike state of altered consciousness that may last for hours or days;
fugue (n.)
a musical form consisting of a theme repeated a fifth above or a fourth below its first statement;
From wordnet.princeton.edu