Etymology
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fry (v.)

late 13c., "cook (something) in a shallow pan over a fire," from Old French frire "to fry" (13c.), from Latin frigere "to roast or fry," from PIE *bher- "to cook, bake" (source also of Sanskrit bhrjjati "roasts," bharjanah "roasting;" Persian birishtan "to roast;" perhaps also Greek phrygein "to roast, bake"). Intransitive sense is from late 14c. U.S. slang meaning "execute in the electric chair" is U.S. slang from 1929. As a noun, "fried meat," from 1630s. Related: Fried; frying. Frying pan is recorded from mid-14c. (friing panne).

fry (n.)

early 14c. (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), "young fish," probably from an Anglo-French noun from Old French frier, froier "to rub, spawn (by rubbing abdomen on sand)," from Vulgar Latin *frictiare. First applied to human offspring c. 1400, in Scottish. Some sources trace this usage, or the whole of the word, to Old Norse frjo, fræ "seed, offspring."

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Definitions of fry
1
fry (v.)
be excessively hot;
If the children stay out on the beach for another hour, they'll be fried
fry (v.)
cook on a hot surface using fat;
fry the pancakes
fry (v.)
kill by electrocution, as in the electric chair;
Synonyms: electrocute
2
fry (n.)
a young person of either sex;
Synonyms: child / kid / youngster / minor / shaver / nipper / small fry / tiddler / tike / tyke / nestling
3
Fry (n.)
English painter and art critic (1866-1934);
Synonyms: Roger Fry / Roger Eliot Fry
Fry (n.)
English dramatist noted for his comic verse dramas (born 1907);
Synonyms: Christopher Fry
From wordnet.princeton.edu