Etymology
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Words related to fraud

defraud (v.)

late 14c., defrauden, "deprive of right, by deception or breech of trust or withholding," from Old French defrauder, from Latin defraudare "to defraud, cheat," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + fraudare "to cheat, swindle" (see fraud). Related: Defrauded; defrauding.

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fraudster (n.)
"one who practices fraud," 1975, from fraud + -ster. Earlier words were fraud (1850); fraudsman (1610s); frauditor (1550s).
fraudulence (n.)

"deceit," c. 1500, from Old French fraudulence, from Latin fraudulentia, from stem of fraus (see fraud).

fraudulent (adj.)
early 15c., from Old French fraudulent, from Latin fraudulentus "cheating, deceitful, dishonest," from stem of fraus "deceit" (see fraud). Earlier was fraudful (c. 1400). The Old French word was fraudios. Related: Fraudulently.
frustrate (v.)

"make of no avail, bring to nothing, prevent from taking effect or coming to fulfillment," mid-15c., from Latin frustratus, past participle of frustrari "to deceive, disappoint, make vain," from frustra (adv.) "in vain, in error," which is related to fraus "injury, harm," a word of uncertain origin (see fraud). Related: Frustrated; frustrating.

frustration (n.)

"act of frustrating, disappointment, defeat," 1550s, from Latin frustrationem (nominative frustratio) "a deception, a disappointment," noun of action from past-participle stem of frustrari "to deceive, disappoint, make vain," from frustra (adv.) "in vain, in error," which is related to fraus "injury, harm," a word of uncertain origin (see fraud). Earlier (mid-15c.) with a now-obsolete sense of "nullification."